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austinkleon:

"Metadata is a love note to the future." #nypl_labs on Twitpic (via @kissane)
cf. "A tag is the soul of the Internet."
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chicagopubliclibrary:

The Open Book Fountain - Budapest, Hungary 
From Gizmodo:

Every few seconds a sheet of water blasts forth from the book’s spine, arcing from one side to the other and creating the illusion that an invisible force is turning the pages of this marble tome.

Click here to see a video of the Open Book Fountain in action!

chicagopubliclibrary:

The Open Book Fountain - Budapest, Hungary 

From Gizmodo:

Every few seconds a sheet of water blasts forth from the book’s spine, arcing from one side to the other and creating the illusion that an invisible force is turning the pages of this marble tome.

Click here to see a video of the Open Book Fountain in action!

Tags: book fountain
Link

iworkatapubliclibrary:

Today I helped a family new to the United States get library cards. After giving them the rundown on what a library membership means, I showed the kids the children’s area. The mother told them they could each check out two books. The smallest child, a girl of seven, picked out two small board…

Text

netgalley:

Recipes for Success: Librarian Voices
How and Why Librarians Should Use NetGalley
Guest Post: Marlene Harris, Seattle Public Library and blogger at Reading Reality

Reading Reality

I’m pleased to introduce a new segment of Recipes for Success, specifically for all of the great librarian members using NetGalley! Did you know that 12,500+ librarians are using NetGalley to discover new titles to purchase for their library collection and recommend to their patrons?

Today’s guest post comes from Marlene Harris, Technical Services Manager at Seattle Public Library. Continue reading to find out how Marlene uses NetGalley as a librarian, and some titles she thinks you should be reading!

Along Came Trouble      Flirting With Disaster      Making it Last

Recipes for Success aims to give NetGalley members helpful information, tools, and best practices to help facilitate your growth and effectiveness as professional readers. Check back often for tips and tricks from the insiders.

Read More

Tags: tumblarians
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sylvar:

Fact: Librarians have cats so conference totes will be used, and go to conferences to get totes for cats.

sylvar:

Fact: Librarians have cats so conference totes will be used, and go to conferences to get totes for cats.

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littlebookthings:

Submission courtesy of anon

littlebookthings:

Submission courtesy of anon

(via bookworm-goddess)

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science-junkie:

Twenty Years Ago Today the World Wide Web Went Public
Twenty years ago today, something happened that changed the digital world forever: CERN published a statement that made the technology behind the World Wide Web available to use, by anybody, on a royalty free basis.
That decision, pushed forward by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, transformed the internet, making it a place where we can all freely share anything and everything—from social media updates, through streamed music, to YouTube videos of cats. It has fundamentally shaped the way we communicate.
To celebrate the momentous occasion of 20 years ago, CERN—the same guys behind all those experiments at the Large Hadron Collider—has republished its very first website at its original URL. It’s not much to look at—but it’s a fine reminder of just how much the web has changed in the past twenty years.
In fact, the republishing of that site is part of a broader project to excavate and preserve a whole host of digital gems that remain from the inception of the web. You can go read a lot more about the project over on CERN’s site. [CERN]
Source: gizmodo.com

science-junkie:

Twenty Years Ago Today the World Wide Web Went Public

Twenty years ago today, something happened that changed the digital world forever: CERN published a statement that made the technology behind the World Wide Web available to use, by anybody, on a royalty free basis.

That decision, pushed forward by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, transformed the internet, making it a place where we can all freely share anything and everything—from social media updates, through streamed music, to YouTube videos of cats. It has fundamentally shaped the way we communicate.

To celebrate the momentous occasion of 20 years ago, CERN—the same guys behind all those experiments at the Large Hadron Collider—has republished its very first website at its original URL. It’s not much to look at—but it’s a fine reminder of just how much the web has changed in the past twenty years.

In fact, the republishing of that site is part of a broader project to excavate and preserve a whole host of digital gems that remain from the inception of the web. You can go read a lot more about the project over on CERN’s site. [CERN]

Source: gizmodo.com

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mydaguerreotypelibrarian:

Library Journal Reviews Editor Henrietta Thornton suggested this latest hunky submission—Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan.
From Wikipedia:

His most notable contributions to the field were his five laws of library science and the development of the first major analytico-synthetic classification system, the colon classification. He is considered to be the father of library science, documentation, and information science in India and is widely known throughout the rest of the world for his fundamental thinking in the field. His birthday is observed every year as the National Library Day in India.
He was a university librarian and professor of library science at Benares Hindu University (1945–47) and professor of library science at the University of Delhi (1947–55). The last appointment made him director of the first Indian school of librarianship to offer higher degrees. He was president of the Indian Library Association from 1944 to 1953. In 1957 he was elected an honorary member of the International Federation for Information and Documentation (FID) and was made a vice president for life of the Library Association of Great Britain.

Ranganathan’s five laws?
Books are for use.
Every reader his [or her] book.
Every book its reader.
Save the time of the reader.
The library is a growing organism.
Sounds pretty awesome to me.

mydaguerreotypelibrarian:

Library Journal Reviews Editor Henrietta Thornton suggested this latest hunky submission—Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan.

From Wikipedia:

His most notable contributions to the field were his five laws of library science and the development of the first major analytico-synthetic classification system, the colon classification. He is considered to be the father of library sciencedocumentation, and information science in India and is widely known throughout the rest of the world for his fundamental thinking in the field. His birthday is observed every year as the National Library Day in India.

He was a university librarian and professor of library science at Benares Hindu University (1945–47) and professor of library science at the University of Delhi (1947–55). The last appointment made him director of the first Indian school of librarianship to offer higher degrees. He was president of the Indian Library Association from 1944 to 1953. In 1957 he was elected an honorary member of the International Federation for Information and Documentation (FID) and was made a vice president for life of the Library Association of Great Britain.

Ranganathan’s five laws?

  • Books are for use.
  • Every reader his [or her] book.
  • Every book its reader.
  • Save the time of the reader.
  • The library is a growing organism.

Sounds pretty awesome to me.

(via laura-in-libraryland)

Tags: librarians
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A column of cats.  From top to bottom, Amelia, La Zorra, and Sophia.

A column of cats.  From top to bottom, Amelia, La Zorra, and Sophia.

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endlesslibraries:

I could have sworn it was somewhere around here. (by Rich Tella)

endlesslibraries:

I could have sworn it was somewhere around here. (by Rich Tella)

(via bookworm-goddess)